Why Suboxone Can Be the Best Choice of Medication for Treating Opioid Addiction

Ellen Diamond, (2021, November 9). Why Suboxone Can Be the Best Choice of Medication for Treating Opioid Addiction. Psychreg on Psychotherapy. https://www.psychreg.org/suboxone-best-choice-medication-treating-opioid-addiction/

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Many rehabilitation centres that offer substance and alcohol abuse treatment by following the medication-assisted treatment (MAT) are actually Suboxone clinics, the name derived from the medicine used for the treatment. Anyone who suffers from opioid addiction and seeks treatment to come out from the vicious cycle of addiction would indeed search for a Suboxone clinic near me. When people become too much dependent on opioids and cannot think of living without them, they desperately look for help from some rehabilitation centre that carries out the treatment for addiction by combining prescription medicine and behavioural therapy and helping them recover from opioid addiction. 

Medicines can be addictive

Opioid addiction can begin with the abuse of some prescription medicines, primarily strong pain killers like morphine, codeine, Vicodin Percocet, Demerol, Hydrocodone, and OxyContin and the known drugs fentanyl and heroin.  Since these drugs are highly addictive, their constant use can lead to drug dependence that turns into an addiction. Drug addiction not only causes economic distress but can have an overwhelming effect on society and health. Prescription drug misuse is rampant in the US and a substantial public health concern that affects two million Americans.  

The latest treatment for opioid addiction by suing Suboxone is proving highly effective and the reason why people look upon the rehabilitation centres as Suboxone clinics. However, the treatment might include many other types of prescription drugs.

What is Suboxone treatment and how it works

Opioids effectively reduce pain because it acts on the brain receptors and when it completely covers the receptors, the brain’s perception of pain goes through a complete change that gives a feeling of reduced pain.  The feeling of reduced pain is so much soothing that it drives people towards consuming the medicine more frequently, which ultimately turns into a deadly addiction. 

The treatment of drug and alcohol addiction with Medication-Assisted treatment includes using a variety of drugs, including Suboxone which helps to taper off gradually the craving for opioids that allows doing way with severe withdrawal symptoms, which are often challenging to handle. 

Suboxone replaces the daily pills that the patient used to take for controlling pain but caused the addiction. Suboxone acts on the brain receptors but fills it only partially, which does not provide the same degree of euphoria that other addictive drugs can offer but at the same time partially satisfies the users, which is enough to curb cravings and take good care of the withdrawal symptoms.   The principle of using Suboxone is similar to fighting fire with fire. 

When coupled with behavioural therapy, which is a must for Suboxone treatment, it addresses the underlying psychological issues of patients that fuel addiction. As a result, patients gradually learn to live with minimal dependence on the harmful medicines that caused addiction and, at the end of the treatment, come out completely clean, leaving the dark days behind. 

The treatment plan takes into consideration the patient’s medical history as well as the social background so that it can address all issues specific to the patient. Since Suboxone has the approval of the FDA, it is safe to start the treatment under an experienced doctor.  


Ellen Diamond did her degree in psychology at the University of Edinburgh. She is interested in mental health, wellness, and lifestyle.


Disclaimer: Psychreg is mainly for information purposes only. Materials on this website are not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis, medical treatment, or therapy. Never disregard professional psychological or medical advice nor delay in seeking professional advice or treatment because of something you have read on this website. Read our full disclaimer here

Source